Barack Obama beats John McCain in popularity on YouTube by a landslide

June 25, 2008

News:  I’ve just published my Fifth Report analyzing the videos of the presidential candidates on YouTube.  Barack Obama continues to beat John McCain in popularity on YouTube by wide margins.

You can view and download the report by clicking here.


Barack Obama now No.1 candidate on YouTube

April 24, 2008

Go to my report.


The Utube Blog study: Ron Paul still rules YouTube, but Huckabee makes a surge

January 9, 2008

The Utube Blog study on Presidential Candidate Videos on YouTube–click to download

News: You can download from the link above my latest report on the use of videos on YouTube by the presidential candidates. The study was completed before the New Hampshire primary.

Analysis: Here are my 3 key findings:

(1) Republican candidate Ron Paul continues to be, by a wide margin, the most popular candidate on YouTube, in terms of the average number of views per video (105,908 views per video) and the number of subscribers to his YouTube channel (42,858). He also has the most total views (9,320,763) on YouTube for any presidential candidate (although he does not have the most viewed single video on YouTube—Mike Huckabee does).

(2) Republican candidate Mike Huckabee has experienced a dramatic growth in the popularity of his videos during November and December 2007. He jumped from close to the worst in average number of views in October 2007 to the second most views per video by January 4, 2008, with 27,818 views per video. Most impressive of all is the fact that Huckabee is the first candidate with a video that has generated over 1 million views on YouTube.

(3) Finally, as the primary season has begun, the candidates’ YouTube videos have seen a huge increase in the number of views than in previous months.


Saturday’s YouTube videos from the candidates in New Hampshire

January 5, 2008

News: I hope to have another official report on the popularity of YouTube videos of the presidential candidates soon. There’s been a lot of movement, especially by Mike Huckabee. You can view my past reports here. In the meantime, I will be posting the campaign videos of the key contenders each day until the New Hampshire primary. Here are Saturday’s videos:

Democrats

John Edwards

Barack Obama

Republicans

Ron Paul

Mitt Romney


The Best YouTube Videos of 2007

December 28, 2007

I’ve watched hundreds, if not thousands, of YouTube videos this year. Here are my selections for The Best YouTube Videos of 2007.

1. Best YouTube Video of the Year: Esmee

Esmee Denters is an 18-year-old Dutch girl who started singing on YouTube from her bedroom. Soon, she started drawing hundreds of thousands of views. Then, in the millions. Eventually, a guy named Justin Timberlake signed her to a record deal. This video was shot right before the announcement of the deal. It represents the best that “user-generated content” has to offer.  Wait for the video’s ending. Esmee’s first album will be released in 2008.

2. First Runner-Up: Miss South Carolina

It pains me to select a TV clip as the First Runner-Up, but this video of Miss South Carolina Lauren Caitlin Upton speaks for itself. She’s beautiful and should be a spokesperson for GPS.

3. Second Runner-Up: James Kotecki interviews Ron Paul from his dorm

From his dorm room, James Kotecki interviewed Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul. Kotecki also interviewed Mike Huckabee, Mike Gravel, John Edwards, and Dennis Kucinich. The citizen-journalist might have more power today than ever before.

4. Third Runner-Up: Lazydork raps YouTube, so does Renetto

Irreverance is king on YouTube.

5. Fourth Runner-Up: Obama girl

Cleavage is queen on YouTube.

6. Fifth Runner-Up: Ron Paul

He’s the most watched candidate on YouTube. Still trying to figure out why.

7. Sixth Runner-Up: Hillary 1984

Why citizens will be a factor in the presidential election in 2008.

[I reserve 24 hours to revise my picks as I think of other videos I’ve watched. Drop me an email if you like to nominate another video. utubeblog [at] gmail [dot] com


Chuck Norris endorses Mike Huckabee on YouTube — is he now the Republican front runner?

December 6, 2007

I used to be a political junkie in high school and a little in college. Not anymore these days. But I do think I have a modest skill in analyzing the political landscape. Several years ago, I told a friend of mine that Rudy Giuliani will be the front runner to get the Republican nomination. He said there’s no way the conservatives would back him, the guy had too much baggage and liberal leaning social policies. I said, 9/11.

Then, just several months ago, I suggested to another friend that Mike Huckabee has a chance on the Republican side. That was when the political pundits said that he had none. Well, today, Huckabee is leading the polls in Iowa. You heard that right, Huckabee is now on top in Iowa. And he’s surging in the polls nationally. Apparently, getting the endorsement of Chuck Norris helped.

Huckabee’s also surging on YouTube. His first video with Chuck Norris (see below) is, by my account, the only video on YouTube from one of the candidates, Republican or Democrat, that has received over 1 million views.

By the way, none of this post should be taken as my endorsement of any candidate.


John McCain attacks Ron Paul during YouTube debate (going beyond question asked)

November 29, 2007

Was this a cheap shot?


NBC Nightly News on the Ron Paul campaign

October 23, 2007

News: After being ignored or dismissed by mainstream media, Ron Paul is slowly beginning to get coverage.  It certainly helped Ron Paul that he could get his message out on YouTube, unfiltered by the mainstream media.

Analysis: He’s been raising a lot of money, but can he win the Republican nomination?


Ron Paul rules YouTube, Fred Thompson flops

October 22, 2007

News: The Utube Blog’s second report on the presidential candidate videos on YouTube is now available. Ron Paul continues to blow by the entire field of candidates, both Democratic and Republican. Newcomer Fred Thompson had a disappointing first month on YouTube.

Download: The Utube Blog second report on Presidential Candidate Videos on YouTube

Key Findings

(1) Republican candidate Ron Paul continues to be, by a wide margin, the most popular candidate on YouTube, in terms of the average number of views per video (85,194 views per video) and the number of subscribers to his YouTube channel (29,658). He also has the most total views (4,344,904) on YouTube for any presidential candidate (although he does not have the most viewed single video on YouTube—Hillary Clinton does).

 

(2) Republican candidate Fred Thompson has drawn only a relatively few number of YouTube viewers in the first month of his campaign, maintaining a very low average number of views per video (3,780 views per video). He gained only 581 subscribers to his YouTube channel. His most watched video captured over 55,000 views.

 

(3) Overall, the videos of all the presidential candidates have drawn only a relatively modest number of views on YouTube, both in terms of the actual views per video and the average number of views per video.

 

final-diagram-youtube-study-sept-07.jpg

 

final-diagram-2-youtube-study.jpg


Ron Paul rules YouTube, Fred Thompson flops

October 18, 2007

My second report on the presidential candidate videos on YouTube will be out soon.  Stay tuned.


Mike Huckabee – Ron Paul exchange in FOX debate

September 7, 2007

News:  Fox had its second debate this week for the Republican presidential candidates.  The best, most substantive exchange occurred between Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul. 

Analysis:  The debate format should allow more of these exchanges, where the candidates can engage each other in a more open debate.  CNN and YouTube should take notes for their Republican debate in December.   If you’re wondering, the FOX Internet poll after the debate had, you guessed it, Ron Paul winning the debate.


Interview about my study on the presidential candidates on YouTube

August 27, 2007

News: I was interviewed in an op-ed published in the Columbus Dispatch about the study I conducted on the presidential candidate videos on YouTube. As you might have guessed, the hot topic of conversation was Ron Paul.


The Utube Blog study: Ron Paul is the No.1 presidential candidate on YouTube, by a landslide

August 13, 2007

News: For the past couple months, I’ve been collecting data on all the presidential candidates’ videos on YouTube. Today, I’m publishing my first report, “Analyzing the Presidential Candidate Videos on YouTube August 2007.”

The report reaches two basic findings for the presidential candidate videos thus far:

(1) The presidential candidates have gained only a relatively modest amount of views and subscribers to their YouTube videos; and

(2) Republican candidate Ron Paul is, by a wide margin, the most popular candidate on YouTube, in terms of the average number of views per video and the number of subscribers to his YouTube channel. He also has the most total views on YouTube for any presidential candidate.

Here’s one slice of the report:

the-utube-blog-august-2007-avg-1-6.jpg

View the report: Click here. I’ve also set up a new blog called The YouTube President with a copy of the report. I’ll be collecting my reports there.

Download the report: The Utube Blog study August 2007.doc

(Copyright permission: Please feel free to copy the report and re-use it, including the graphs, in other works, as long as attribution is given to Professor Edward Lee and The Utube Blog. Thanks.)


Ron Paul makes The Economist and in Spotlight on YouTube

August 2, 2007

News: YouTube sensation and presidential candidate Ron Paul was featured in an article in The Economist, provocatively titled: “Paul the Apostate: Is this would-be president brave or crazy?” The article reveals that Ron Paul has more money on hand than John McCain and has increased his numbers in the polls from 1% to 3% of the Republican voters.

This week, Paul is also in the YouTube Spotlight.  Here’s his video:

For the candidate who’s the most popular on YouTube, I think he needs to have his people buy a better camera, with a sharper picture.


Will skipping YouTube debate hurt Romney + Giuliani, and Republicans in ’08?

August 1, 2007

News: The backlash appears already in full force, as both Rudy Giuliani and Mitt Romney decided — for “scheduling” and “snowman” reasons — to skip the scheduled YouTube debate co-sponsored by the Republican party of Florida. (More from Wash Post) The debate, planned for September, has been scrapped for now, given the no-shows by the 2 leading Republicans. The blog world has been abuzz with how this will hurt their campaigns.

Analysis: My guess, and hope, is that it will all be worked out at a different time. If Giuliani and Romney don’t join, that will only look bad for them.  If someone like Fred Thompson joined by then for a rescheduled debate, those two would have no choice but to be a part of the debate.


Republican CNN/YouTube debate postponed

July 28, 2007

News: After front-runner Rudy Giuliani said he had a scheduling conflict and Mitt Romney said he might not go, the CNN-YouTube debate on September 17 for the Republican presidential candidates in Florida apparently has been postponed.

Analysis: Let’s hope Giuliani and Romney can clear their schedules. Let’s hope that this doesn’t mean it’s cancelled.


If you Google Ron Paul

July 28, 2007

News: More video of Ron Paul’s visit to Google on July 13. Looks like Dr. Paul blew away the crowd. It’s still hard to believe that Ron Paul is the most exciting candidate of all the candidates so far.  At least on the Internet and YouTube, Ron Paul is a rock star.

I promise to have my study of the Ron Paul YouTube phenomenon soon.


Republican candidates slow to join YouTube debate

July 27, 2007

News: So far, only Ron Paul and John McCain have agreed to participate in the CNN YouTube debate on September 17 co-sponsored by the Republican Party of Florida. Apparently, Rudy Giuliani won’t join. And Mitt Romney took a pot shot at CNN/YouTube, stating, “I think the presidency ought to be held at a higher level than having to answer questions from a snowman.” (more from Wash Post)

Analysis: Cowardly.


Ron Paul rocks Google + YouTube

July 25, 2007

News:  Ron Paul did an interview at Google last week.  He was the 5th candidate so far to be invited to @Google Talks–following John Edwards, Bill Richardson, John McCain, and Hillary Clinton.  So guess which candidate’s interview has the most views on YouTube today?  Well, after only 1 week of being up (while the other candidates have been up for 1 month or longer), Ron Paul has killed the competition.  He’s over 111,000 views–Hillary, Edwards, McCain, and Richardson don’t even come close, combined!

Analysis:  I will soon publish a study showing the Ron Paul phenomenon on YouTube.  He’s the most popular candidate on YouTube, of all the candidates, Democrat or Republican.  It’s very hard to explain.


Ron Paul, No. 1 presidential candidate on YouTube

June 25, 2007

News: This is follow up to last week’s post on Rep. Ron Paul, the libertarian Republican candidate. This guy has the most subscribers on YouTube, more than doubling the closest competitor, Barack Obama. Based on my eyeballing the stats, I said last week I think Ron Paul gets the most views per video of any candidate, Democratic or Republican. Well, after doing a little math, my inital figures indicate that he’s killing the competition.

Ron Paul gets on average 71,000+ views per video. My guess was that Hillary Clinton was the closest competitor based on eyeballing the numbers. Hillary only gets, though, if my math is correct, 40,000+ views per video. Again, Ron Paul is nearly doubling the nearest competition.  (I hope to double check all these numbers, so take them as preliminary.)

Analysis: The key point for Ron Paul was the debate on May 3rd, where he went toe-to-toe with Rudy Giuliani and many people think only Paul was left standing. As this excellent chart shows, Paul’s subscribers on YouTube skyrocketed after the debate. Of course, the number of views for Paul probably include some people who just want to learn more about him, since he is not nationally known. Candidates like Giuliani, Hillary Clinton, and Barack Obama already have the name recognition.

[Disclaimer: This is in no way an endorsement of any kind.]


Video of the week: Who is Ron Paul, and why is he the most viewed presidential candidate on YouTube?

June 22, 2007

Rep. Ron Paul from Texas is a libertarian and a Republican presidential candidate. He voted against the authorization for the Iraq war. Surprisingly, Ron Paul appears to be the most viewed candidate on YouTube, with his videos often generating several hundred thousand views.

I haven’t done the math, but, after a quick eyeballing of stats, I think Ron Paul’s average viewership per video makes him the No.1 Most Viewed candidate. Better than Rudy Giuliani, better than John McCain, better than Hillary Clinton, better than Barack Obama, better than John Edwards. (Sure, it’s possible a handful of people could inflate the number of views on YouTube, but I have no reason to believe that’s what’s happening here. He has the most subscribers, 17,564.)

OK, popular videos on the Internet don’t necessarily mean votes (think of Ned Lamont or Snakes on a Plane), but if this guy had the political machinery and money behind him, who knows what kind of noise he would make on the Republican side. Ron Paul got a lot of national attention after he went toe-to-toe with Rudy Giuliani, who took umbrage at Paul’s suggestion that U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East had played a part in making the terrorists hate America before 9/11. Giuliani characterized Paul’s comment as saying that American policy invited the terrorist attack on 9/11. Paul did not back down to Giuliani’s interruption, though, and reiterated his point about interventionist foreign policy abroad creating blowback against America. After the debate, Paul even gave Giuliani a reading assignment to read the 9/11 Commission Report, Blowback, Imperial Hubris, and other foreign policy books. The exchange is on the video above.

[Disclaimer: This is not an endorsement of any kind.]